Post Graduate Researchers

We are an inclusive and welcoming research group who recognises the value of a multi-generational committee. We have a long history of active and valued PGR/ECR committee members and hope new members find this PGR page useful.

Please feel free to pass items of interest on to Hannah Budge and Natasha Coleman, our PGR committee members, for consideration. You can find their contact details below.

Postgraduate Representatives

Hannah Budge

Hannah is in her third year of an ESRC-funded PhD at Newcastle University, where she is supervised by Prof. Sally Shorthall and Prof. Mark Shucksmith.

Her thesis will examine the role of women in agriculture in the Scottish and two Atlantic Canadian Islands. Looking at the barriers, in what was traditionally viewed as a masculine industry, experienced between and within these communities.

This year, Hannah will oversee the RGRG PGR blog posts, so if you are interested in writing a post, get in touch! Hannah and Natasha will work together planning RGRG contributions to the Mid-Term and Annual conferences and also plan to organise some writing workshops.

Hannah looks forward to continuing to develop the activities she enjoyed prior to joining the committee with the rest of the RGRG team.

You can contact Hannah by email: h.budge2@newcastle.ac.uk or on Twitter: @HannahBudge

Natasha Coleman

Natasha is in the 2nd year of her ESRC-funded PhD at Swansea University, where she is supervised by Dr Keith Halfacree.

Her research focuses on how English and Welsh private estates are adapting within a 21st century context.  In particular, this centres on the cultural landscape through which game shooting materializes and evaluates the lived experiences of actors that uphold these spaces.

This year, her main role is organising the Book Club. She and Hannah will work together planning RGRG contributions to the Mid-Term and Annual conferences and also plan to organise some writing workshops.

Natasha looks forward to weaving her interests in more-than-human geographies, creative methods, re-connection to food, and social justice into her work with the RGRG and to working with a diverse and talented team.

You can contact Natasha by email: 988535@swansea.ac.uk
or on Twitter: @ncc_96

Blogs

Call for Short articles:

You can write about part of your research, your experience of fieldwork, reflections of doing a PhD, anything that you think will be interesting! It is a great experience to help focus and summarise your current research plans or methodology. For further information click here or get in touch with Hannah.

Natasha Coleman (Swansea University) shares her research with shooting estate communities during a pandemic.

A field sketch of a pheasant ‘drive’ described by a gamekeeper, (NC, 2021)

Niamh McHugh (University of Leicester and Loughborough University) on The Digital Marketing of Rural Real Estate – Even More Important Post-Covid?

Dent’s Terrace, Winchcombe (AM, 2019)

Théo Lenormand (Countryside and Community Research Institute) on Covid 19 Crisis – Short of Milk, Short of Cash

Cows near Beeston Castle, Cheshire (AM, 2019)

Hannah Budge [(Newcastle University) (but originally from our most northerly UK island, Shetland)] talks about women in farming in A PhD, a pandemic and the peripheral.

Hannah Budge, front, at lambing time (HB, 2020)

Dr Faye Shortland (University of Reading) on Living cultural heritage within the Lake District National Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site

Towards Buttermere, Lake District National Park (AM, 2019)

Upcoming Events

CCRI Winter School 2022

Advert for the CCRI Winter School  3rd and 4th March 2022 at Park Campus, University of Gloucestershire.
Advert for CCRI Winter School 2022

Thursday 3rd and Friday 4th March, 2022.
CCRI, Park Campus, University of Gloucestershire, Cheltenham.

Call for papers now open: email dkeech@glos.ac.uk for more information.

An overview of this annually held event can be found in the video below.


Recent Events

Postgraduate Book Club

Our Book Club returned on Friday 5th November at 11.00am. We discussed Robin Wall Kimmerer‘s Braiding Sweetgrass.

The Book Club is a great way of being involved in relevant discussions surrounding current rural affairs and importantly meeting colleagues with much in common, at a time where it is still difficult to forge such connections in person. If you would like more information about the next event (January 2022), please contact Natasha.

New and Emerging Rural Researchers: Rural Research in the 2020s

Royal Geographical Annual Conference, Thursday 2nd September 2021.
10 Postgraduate Rural Researchers presented across two conference sessions. The first focused mainly on agricultural topics, whilst the second looked at rural planning and governance.

Presentations from the New and Emerging Rural Researchers session at the 2021 RGS Annual Conference

Our postgraduate sessions feature every year at the Annual Conference. If you’re interested in sharing your work, please get in touch with our Postgraduate Representatives and keep up to date with our call for papers, which is usually released around the end of January each year.

CCRI Winter School 2021

Delivered over Zoom, 20th – 22nd January. The annual Winter School offered postgraduates the opportunity to present their work and hear from several experienced rural researchers and supervisors. Though online, Pippa Simmonds writes in our Summer 2021 Newsletter, it continued its tradition of being a supportive and encouraging space in which to share ideas and receive feedback.

Advert for the CCRI Winter School 2021

Postgraduate Symposium 2020

Online, August 2020. Though the RGS Annual Conference had been cancelled, we wanted to offer postgraduates the opportunity to present their work during a symposium around the time the conference would usually have been held. We heard from four fantastic presenters, and as Auvikki’s quote shows, it was a great opportunity to gain feedback on current work and discuss contemporary rural issues.

“Presenting at the RGRG PhD/ECR Symposium was a great possibility to share my research and receive feedback. It was a double first for me: the first presentation since I started my PhD and the first time presenting online… thanks to the chat function and short discussion after the presentation it was a valuable experience that gave me additional input to develop my work. In this time when we mostly work from home this online symposium was a very welcome and helpful platform for interaction.”

Auvikki de Boon, University of Reading

CCRI Winter School – Rurality in the 2020s. A new decade of rural scholarship?

University of Gloucestershire, 30th January 2020. The event sought to upskill new researchers in an approachable and supportive environment in a number of ways and formats. For more information on this annual event follow the link.

The guiding themes being considered this year were:

* Socio-spatial Inequalities * Governance and Policies
* Economic and technological Challenges
* Quality of Life
* Smart Villages

* Landscape Transitions
* Rural Entrepreneurship
* Agricultural Transformations
* Rural Housing & Mobilities

See our 2019-2021 PGR Representative Aimee Morse’s feedback on the CCRI Winter School 2020.